Nobody (2021)

Nobody (2021)

Nobody (2021)

I was a bit tired last night and didn’t have much brain power for a new film of much over 90 minutes, especially after at least the previous 20 had been taken up with trying to decide on which film to watch.

Finally settled on Nobody (2021) which I had seen at the cinema previously, an easy film with nothing too taxing for the brain, exactly what I needed.

Starring Bob Odenkirk from so many different things but the latest biggie is Better Call Saul, with great parts for Christopher Lloyd, Connie Nelson, Michael Ironside, and more.

A ‘retired’ auditor (government killer) is living in the ‘burbs, a life of boring monotony, trying to grasp what he thought he really wanted, normality, until a home invasion sets off a stream of events which culminates in strapping a claymore mine to a shatter-proof window to make a final point.

Lots of extreme violence with a decent back story packed into the limited run time of the film made it feel as though there was no down time, apart from the bits about the monotony of American suburban life.

The choreographed violence often gets compared to that of John Wick, true to a certain extent, this feels more visceral, real, crunchy. John Wick’s action scenes almost feel like a well choreographed dance, you really feel the pain in Nobody, the crunch feels crunchy.

My favourite though is Christopher Lloyd as the retired FBI father, who else could get away with a shit-eating grin whilst draped in several shotguns.

Overall a fun film that is hyper-violent, but if you know this going in and view it almost like a cartoon you can get a lot out of it.

Looking forward to Nobody: Back from Obscurity, or whatever they decide to call the sequel.

Get your copy at Amazon (£)

Nobody Action, Crime, Drama, Thriller | March 26, 2021 (United States) 7.4
Director: Ilya NaishullerWriter: Derek KolstadStars: Bob Odenkirk, Aleksey Serebryakov, Connie NielsenSummary: Emmy winner Bob Odenkirk (Better Call Saul, The Post, Nebraska) stars as Hutch Mansell, an underestimated and overlooked dad and husband, taking life's indignities on the chin and never pushing back. A nobody. When two thieves break into his suburban home one night, Hutch declines to defend himself or his family, hoping to prevent serious violence. His teenage son, Blake (Gage Munroe, The Shack), is disappointed in him and his wife, Becca (Connie Nielsen, Wonder Woman), seems to pull only further away. The aftermath of the incident strikes a match to Hutch's long-simmering rage, triggering dormant instincts and propelling him on a brutal path that will surface dark secrets and lethal skills. In a barrage of fists, gunfire and squealing tires, Hutch must save his family from a dangerous adversary (famed Russian actor Aleksey Serebryakov, Amazon's McMafia)-and ensure that he will never be underestimated as a nobody again. ?Universal Pictures

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The Lighthouse (2019)

This is the first of the reviews that I’m going to be putting out there, learning how to write about film (and writing words down in general). I’ve always been a huge film/TV fan and never really felt I was allowed to have an opinion, but you know what? I do and I’m going to be sharing it through regular posts on this blog.

The format of the review may change as I go along and gain more confidence and skill in writing but I thought if I don’t get one out now I never will.

You can always follow me over on Twitter as well for live watch throughs of TV series as and when I do them and various ramblings about whatever seems to take my fancy.


The Lighthouse

The Lighthouse

Shot in (almost) square format which gave an old-fashioned feel to the film, though the black and white was crisp and had none of the greyness associated with older films. The deep black tones of the film matched the deep tones of the constant fog horn setting a mood that got darker and darker as the film progressed.

“The light is mine”

The darkness is so oppressive that the counterpoint and beat of the lighthouse light felt alive, a heartbeat, a seductive creature in itself, maybe the real inhabitant of the island.

Both Patterson and Dafoe portray their characters brilliantly, this is emphasised with stunning direction and camera work, every frame is redolent with depth and meaning, with the solitude being carefully crafted and counterbalanced with foreboding and foreshadowing.

There is a definite Lovecraftian feel to the oppression, the sea, and madness. This tone then ups a gear a third of the way into the film changing from a pure portrait of solitude to something else as the wind changes.

Touching on a lot of different themes this is a great, though harrowing, watch with stunning performances from both actors and I’m sure it will improve from multiple watchings.

A well-crafted portrayal of a bleak existence and descent into alcohol-fuelled madness where myth and reality blend into one wind-swept and rain-lashed nightmare.

Get your copy at Amazon (£)

The Lighthouse Drama, Fantasy, Horror, Mystery | November 1, 2019 (United States) 7.5
Director: Robert EggersWriter: Robert Eggers, Max EggersStars: Robert Pattinson, Willem Dafoe, Valeriia KaramanSummary: As the wavering cry of the foghorn fills the air, the taciturn former lumberjack, Ephraim Winslow, and the grizzled lighthouse keeper, Thomas Wake, set foot in a secluded and perpetually grey islet off the coast of late-19th-century New England. For the following four weeks of back-breaking work and unfavourable conditions, the tight-lipped men will have no one else for company except for each other, forced to endure irritating idiosyncrasies, bottled-up resentment, and burgeoning hatred. Then, amid bad omens, a furious and unending squall maroons the pale beacon's keepers in the already inhospitable volcanic rock, paving the way for a prolonged period of feral hunger; excruciating agony; manic isolation, and horrible booze-addled visions. Now, the eerie stranglehold of insanity tightens. Is there an escape from the wall-less prison of the mind? —Nick Riganas

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You can become a paid subscriber if you want to help support and develop the blog, helping pay for various streaming subscriptions and the occasional Hammer House of Horror box set and the popcorn to eat whilst watching all this, by becoming a Patreon.

You can always email me on steve@ephemeral.co.uk with any suggestions.